FAQ's

What is the Tree Escrow Account?

The Tree Escrow Account is an account used to house money paid in lieu of developments planting mitigation trees on-site. The amount per tree is $675. $675 is the cost to plant a tree and maintain it for 3 years. This amount is reviewed every 4 years to make sure it is in line with market value. For more information about the Tree Escrow Account please visit the Unified Development Code Chapter 167.04 J 4.

What is a mitigation tree?

A mitigation tree is defined as a tree that is being planted to make up for tree canopy lost related to new developments. Every site in Fayetteville has a required percent minimum of canopy that must be preserved. Click here to see the Zoning Designations in the UDC Chapter 167.04 C, Table 1. If a development needs to go below the required percent minimum canopy amount, they are required to mitigate for the trees. 

Where can mitigation trees be planted? 

Mitigation trees can be planted on-site or off-site. If the trees are to be planted off-site, the property needs to be owned by the same property owner. 

Who pays into the Tree Escrow Account?

The owner of the site being developed or the developer. 

When can a developer pay into the Tree Escrow Account?

Tree escrow payments are only used as a last resort during the development process. Tree preservation on-site is always the preferred option, with on-site mitigation, off-site mitigation to be considered in descending order only if the more preferred option cannot be fully achieved. (Unified Development Code167.04 J 4) 

What happens to the money in the Tree Escrow Account?

Money in the Tree Escrow Account must be spent within 7 years of the City receiving the funds. The account is managed by the Urban Forestry Department. The money is spent on planting trees in on City property and right-of-ways. 

When is a developer required to plant trees?

A developer is required to plant trees in the following scenarios: 

  • Street Trees - one street tree per 30' of street. 
  • Parking Lot Trees - one tree per 12 parking spaces.
  • Detention Pond Trees - based on square footage of the detention pond.
  • Mitigation Trees - If the required minimum canopy percentage is not met, mitigation trees are required.

For more information about what trees are required during development, click here to view the Landscape Regulations Chapter of the Unified Development Code.

What is a container grown tree?

 A container grown trees are grown in a soil-less media comprised on components such as pine bark and peat moss. They are lightweight, and easier to handle than balled-and-burlapped trees. The entire root system of a container grown plant is left intact when planted. 

What is a balled-and-burlapped tree?

 A balled-and-burlapped tree is grown in native soil and weighs more than container grown trees. The trees are harvested in the fall and as much soil as possible is retained prior to being wrapped in burlap. Balled-and-burlapped trees have a healthier root system than container grown trees. 

What time of year should trees be planted? 

It's ideal for trees to be planted in the fall. If they can not be planted in the fall, they can be planted in the spring. 

When is a homeowner required to plant a tree?

A homeowner is required to plant a tree if they live in the (Hillside Hilltop Overlay District) HHOD and remove below the percent minimum canopy requirements. Click here to see if your house is in the HHOD.

Who maintains City Right-of-Ways?

The City of Fayetteville Transportation Department maintains City right-of-ways.

Do I need to maintain the Right-of-Way in front of my house?

Yes. The right-of-way in front of homeowners property is to be maintained by the property owner adjacent to the right-of-way. Click here to view the code that discusses right-of-way maintenance by the homeowner. It is located in Chapter 167.06 A. 

When is the City's annual free tree giveaway?

The Urban Forestry Department hosts an annual tree giveaway every fall. The trees are free to the public upon proof of Fayetteville residency. For information about this years event, click here.